The Royal Opera: Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra

Part of Birmingham International Concert Season 2012/13… more events…

Part of Entertaining Erdington… more events…

Sunday 7th July

Symphony Hall, Birmingham

The Royal Opera Chorus

The Orchestra of the Royal Opera House

Sir Antonio Pappano conductor

Thomas Hampson Simon Boccanegra

Hibla Gerzmava Amelia Grimaldi

Ferruccio Furlanetto Jacopo Fiesco

Russell Thomas Gabriele Adorno

Dimitri Platanias Paolo Albiani

Jihoon Kim Pietro

Verdi Simon Boccanegra 150’

This concert has a running time of c.3 hours including one 25’ interval.

The Royal Opera returns to Symphony Hall to celebrate the 2013 bicentenary of Verdi’s birth in one of the highlights of the season. For this visit, music director Sir Antonio Pappano has chosen Verdi’s dark lyrical drama, Simon Boccanegra. Set in 14th-century Genoa, this great work is a brooding tragedy and a psychological study of power, treachery and the unbreakable bond between a father and his daughter.

An evening as much of Verdi’s music as the singing, driven (we are lucky to have him) by Antonio Pappano’s tremendous feel for drama in music as conductor.  The Independent

Hampson’s interpretation is nothing short of ideal Thomas Hampson as Simon Boccanegra at Wiener Konzerthaus, bachtrack.com

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Watch: Antonio Pappano on The Royal Opera’s performance in Birmingham *Click HERE*

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Review by Diane Parkes, BehindTheArras:

Click here for full review

…     “This Royal Opera concert performance certainly kept us all on our toes as it succeeded in bringing to life the troubled city state and the joys and pains of its characters.

Thomas Hampson was an imposing Boccanegra who balanced his formidable and ruthless might as a leader with compassion and love for his daughter. He was thoroughly believable in both public and private mode – with his final collapse into his daughter’s arms a really tragic moment.

Hibla Gerzmava was a gentle Amelia who also betrayed her own fire in the belly when she felt either her lover or her father were in danger.

Playing that lover Adorno, Russell Thomas swept us all of our feet with his beautifully rich tenor voice while Boccanegra’s long term foe Fiesco was played with just the right amount of anger by Ferruccio Furlanetto.”     …

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