Serenade to Music

Thursday 21st January, 7.30pm

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Programme

  • Grainger  In a Nutshell, 20′
  • Vaughan Williams  Serenade to Music †, 14′
  • Varese  Ionisation, 8′
  • Judith Weir Storm †, 18′
  • Grainger  The Warriors , 20′

Imagine warriors of all times and all lands, gathering in one place to drink and dance; imagine jazz breaks, three pianos, and a super-sized orchestra… and you’re starting to get some idea of Percy Grainger’s jaw-dropping The Warriors. Add Vaughan Williams’ ravishing, Shakespeare-inspired Serenade, 16 brilliant young soloists, a spirited showcase for the CBSO’s world-beating young choruses and a “Gum-Suckers’ March”, and…well, what can we say? You’ve simply got to hear it!

Available on BBC Radio 3 Live in Concert here for a month

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Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post:

Click here for full review

…     “And because of these forces we had a remarkable bonus, Edgard Varese’s Ionisation for 13 percussionists and piano, crisply, precisely directed by Seal, and beautifully phrased and coloured by the players.

By contrast, a tiny instrumental ensemble (including many of the flute family) accompanied the expert CBSO Youth and Children’s Choruses in a revival of Judith Weir’s Storm, keenly imagined and with a lovely serene ending. Under Simon Halsey the youngsters sang with confident projection and brilliant diction, and all from memory, to the delight of the composer, interviewed engagingly onstage, like the two conductors, by presenter Tom Redmond.

The texts came from The Tempest, this performance a contribution to the CBSO’s Shakespeare quatercentenary thread. And particularly heartwarming was the presentation of one of the most beautiful Shakespearean works ever penned, Vaughan Williams’ Serenade to Music.

This setting of the Belmont Scene from Act V of The Merchant of Venice requires 16 solo singers, and for its premiere celebrating Sir Henry Wood’s Golden Jubilee as a conductor in 1938, the composer specified 16 named soloists at the top of the professional tree.

Here Simon Halsey presented 16 students from Conservatoires UK-wide, and what a wonderful sound they created, both in their individual contributions and in their melding together as a choral group.”     …

Andris Nelsons’ Farewell Concerts

Symphony Hall, Birmingham

Thursday 18th June, 7.30pm

Programme

  • Ešenvalds Lakes Awake at Dawn, 13′
  • Mahler Symphony No. 3, 92′

All good things come to an end. And on what are sure to be emotional evenings, Andris Nelsons has chosen to say farewell to Birmingham with Mahler’s huge, rapturous hymn to nature – both unchanging, and forever renewing. A beautiful new choral work by Andris’s fellow-Latvian Eriks Ešenvalds – jointly commissioned (thanks to support from the Feeney Trust) with Andris’s new orchestra in Boston – brings our orchestra, choruses, audience and conductor together to celebrate seven inspirational years.
Share your memories of Andris’ time with the CBSO
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Support the CBSO
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Andris Nelsons says Birmingham must keep loving the CBSO.

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Farewell Andris – CBSO Gallery, video, etc

Storify here

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Review by John Quinn, SeenandHeard, MusicWeb:
Click here for full review
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     “Lakes Awake at Dawn is scored for SATB choir and a large orchestra and in this performance played for about 10 minutes. In it Ešenvalds sets some lines by the Latvian poet, Inge Ābele in an English translation to which the composer has appended some words of his own, also in English. The score plays continuously but has two clearly defined sections. In the first, the Ābele setting, the music is tense and powerful, depicting, to paraphrase the composer’s own description, “one’s emotional unrest, anxiety, and physical running away from danger at night in a forest.” Nelsons inspired his combined forces to project this music very strongly, creating a potent atmosphere. Ešenvalds’ own words depict the arrival at the consoling safety of a lake. Here the music becomes hymn-like. The writing for both choir and orchestra has great beauty and is initially tranquil though it gradually builds to a majestic climax, retreating thereafter to a soft consonant orchestral conclusion. The piece has great impact – especially in such a committed performance as this one – and its enthusiastic reception by the audience clearly delighted the composer, who was present. […]

[…]

The concluding Adagio opened with wonderfully rapt playing from the CBSO strings; you sensed they were on their collective mettle, determined to deliver one last time for Nelsons – and they did. Nelsons paced the music broadly and generously but though the tempo was expansive there was always a sense that the music was moving forward with purpose: there was a goal in sight. Throughout this movement the orchestra were at the top of their game. Impressive dynamic contrasts were a telling feature of the reading. In the last few minutes there was a true sense that Nelsons was leading his forces to the summit; certainly he drew every last ounce of commitment from the orchestra. He surely knew that the last great D major chord would be followed by an immediate ovation but Nelsons held the moment, his arms aloft, so that no applause intruded until the music had reverberated around the hall and properly died away. Only then did he lower his arms.[…]

[…]

During a prolonged standing ovation Nelsons plunged into the ranks of the orchestra; it seemed as if he shook hands with or hugged most of the players on the platform. After several minutes he gave a disarming short farewell speech in which, typically, he stressed two themes: the CBSO family, including its audience, and a strong plea to the people of Birmingham to cherish their orchestra. And so with this unforgettable performance the Nelsons era came to an end, though it’s not quite the end for he and the orchestra and the CBSO Chorus have one last outing together: Beethoven’s Ninth at the BBC Proms on 19 July. He will be back in Birmingham, I’m sure, as an honoured guest, but for now, with his successor still to be chosen, he leaves big shoes to fill.”     …

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Review by Robert Gainer, BachTrack:
Click here for full review
…       “Ešenwald’s composition was commissioned by both the CBSO and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Nelson’s new home. It was fitting that the great Latvian conductor should have used the opportunity to promote the music of one of Latvia’s best contemporary composers in this UK première. The CBSO Chorus clearly relished the work, projecting their magnificent sound throughout the hall with enthusiasm and diction that made the most of the counterpoints and rhythms. Although a number of the lines from the text were repeated, it was never repetitive thanks to the imaginative and colourful orchestration. At various points I could hear the sound of gulls on the lake coming from the violins, the waters of the lake rippling in sync with Nelsons’ elongated fingers, and the sun finally breaching the horizon to a percussive technique that looked from afar like a string bow being drawn across a xylophone block. Yet this was not ‘experimental’ music, but a mature and innovative composition in its portrayal of both imagery and narrative. I have heard some of Ešenwald’s work before on recording and I have been impressed. Its impact in concert is manifold, and I shall be seeking opportunities to hear his work again. (sic) […]
[…]     

Highlights from the other movements were aplenty. The changes of mood in the third movement were brilliantly executed, with the offstage flugelhorn exquisitely lyrical. Mezzo-soprano Michaela Schuster’s performance was perfectly measured and supported by some mellifluous French horn playing. The CBSO Youth and Children’s Choruses were enchanting in the fifth movement, maintaining good balance with the adult chorus and bringing joyous light relief after the profundity of the fourth movement. In the final movement Nelsons, who had conducted with passion and energy throughout and sometimes jumping on the spot, seemed to get renewed strength and there was a palpable response from the musicians as the finale built to its emphatic conclusion.As Nelsons cut the final thunderous chord his arms remained aloft, motionless and statuesque. Two thousand two hundred lungs simultaneously suspended their breath. Not until the sound had completely faded away after a prolonged pause did he move. Only then did the audience exhale, rising spontaneously as one in a standing ovation that went well past the point of hand hurting.

 

So, what is it that Nelsons has with the CBSO that they find so difficult to replace? Personal chemistry. Despite the risks, the CBSO is right to hold out until they find such chemistry again before appointing Nelsons’ successor.”    

*****

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 Review by Fiona Maddocks:

Click here for full review

…     “A hundred minutes is a long time to be on the edge of your seat, but Nelsons kept us there throughout this epic hymn to man and nature.

During his time in Birmingham he has made his mark with resplendent Wagner and Strauss, electrifying Beethoven and a shoal of world premieres and recordings. The orchestra, trained for 18 years by Simon Rattle and for a decade by Sakari Oramo, was already on fine form. With Nelsons they have discovered a new freedom of expression. This reflects the qualities of this warm-hearted musician from Riga, not yet 40, who encountered his first opera – Tannhäuser – aged five, cried when the hero died, and decided to become a conductor.

Nelsons working his way round the entire CBSO to say his goodbyes.

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Nelsons working his way round the entire CBSO to say his goodbyes. Photograph: Neil Pugh

The Ešenvalds work, Lakes Awake at Dawn, recalls a dark event in Latvian history – June 1940 – when a mass Soviet deportation to Siberia forced thousands to flee their homes and spend a fearful night in the forest. After an explosive start, the work achieves a radiant calm as dawn arrives. The writing is tonal and ecstatic, immediate in impact rather than radical. Commissioned both by the CBSO and Boston, where it was premiered last year, it was a thoughtful prelude to the Mahler, troubling more for its subject matter than its harmonies.

Nelsons has always shaped every phrase and nuance – unlike, say, Barenboim, who sometimes drops his arms altogether and leaves his players to get on with it. Edging towards the precipice with his fascination for detail, Nelsons somehow always holds the work secure and intact. This was true in the half-hour-long first movement of the Mahler. Colours and effects stood out as if for the first time – the burbling bassoons, the military wind-band mood of the high E flat clarinets. (“Yes, Mr Mahler has E flat clarinets on the brain,” sniped a Viennese critic, one of many who questioned the composer’s sanity when the work was new.)

Watch the CBSO’s farewell video.

Using a full avian repertoire of gestures, Nelsons shifts from gawky wet crow to elegant flamingo to shrinking sparrow to, in the limitless melody of the final movement, a giant kite gliding freely in space. His players, never knowing what might happen next, are ever alert. Check out the CBSO’s tribute video, and see him waggle his hands behind his ears to conjure a brass trill. Boston will enjoy him, if they can keep him.”     …

*****

Andris Nelsons’ Farewell Concerts

Symphony Hall, Birmingham

Wednesday 17th June, 7.30pm

Programme

  • Ešenvalds Lakes Awake at Dawn, 13′
  • Mahler Symphony No. 3, 92′

All good things come to an end. And on what are sure to be emotional evenings, Andris Nelsons has chosen to say farewell to Birmingham with Mahler’s huge, rapturous hymn to nature – both unchanging, and forever renewing. A beautiful new choral work by Andris’s fellow-Latvian Eriks Ešenvalds – jointly commissioned (thanks to support from the Feeney Trust) with Andris’s new orchestra in Boston – brings our orchestra, choruses, audience and conductor together to celebrate seven inspirational years.
Share your memories of Andris’ time with the CBSO .
See the final rehearsal pictures of CBSO with Andris Nelsons here
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Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post
Click here for full review
…     ” “Please continue to love this orchestra; I feel almost guilty that I am leaving,” were Andris Nelsons’ parting words to the packed audience gathered for his final concert in Symphony Hall as music director of the CBSO after seven amazing years. […]
Sticking with these supposedly slighter central movements, Michaela Schuster was the Erda-like mezzo soloist in the “O Mensch, gib Acht!” Nietzche setting, joined by the ebullient CBSO Chorus Ladies, sounding delightfully youthful, and Julian Wilkins’ remarkable CBSO Youth and Children’s Choruses for the medieval exuberance of “Es sungen drei Engel”.

Full marks to the youngsters for their exemplary attentiveness throughout such a long concert. And so to the top and tail.

The opening movement, nature stirring into life, was persuasively delivered under Nelsons, his conducting gestures constantly alert and choreographic (one of his CBSO predecessors, Boult, would not have approved), balancing colour, dynamics and multi-metred textures always with the most detailed clarity.

World-stopping is an appropriate word for the finale, and some conductors might make its melodic/harmonic richness sound glutinous. Nelsons gave it a flow and sense of direction, growing at last to the tremendous affirmation, two timpanists pounding out the most fundamental of musical intervals (nice to welcome back Peter Hill as an old-stager — trumpeter Alan Thomas was another), as Mahler’s vision of the world was at last achieved.

This finale’s gorgeous melody has a phrase initially sung out by Eduardo Vassallo’s cellists, and it sounds hauntingly like the tune of the old song “I’ll be seeing you in all the old familiar places”.

Sorry, Andris, we won’t. But we all wish we were.”

*****

Review by Ivan Hewett, Telegraph:

Click here for full review

“Andris Nelsons, the brilliant Latvian conductor who’s led the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra these past seven years, is departing for Boston. It seemed appropriate that, to say their farewells, he and the orchestra chose to play the most colossal symphony in the repertoire, Mahler’s 3rd.

Andris Nelsons may not be particularly big in stature, but on the podium he seems like a giant. He leans forward eagerly as if to scoop the sound from the players, sculpting it with huge embracing gestures.

This might seem domineering, but what makes Nelsons’ music-making so humanly appealing is that the music possesses him, not the other way round. That inspires the players as well as us. “He catches your eye to enthuse you, then lets you do things your own way,” said one of the wind players, one of several orchestral members who gave spoken tributes to Nelsons from the platform.

These followed the 12-minute curtain-raiser, a setting of two poems for chorus and orchestra by Latvian composer Eriks Esenvalds about cold Siberian lakes, and hope arising even in the dead of night.”     …

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Review by Andrew Clements, Guardian:

Click here for full review

…     “Some conductors ease their way into what is the longest of all Mahler’s symphonies, but that is not Nelsons’s approach. The CBSO horns delivered the opening theme like a challenge, setting the stage for a performance that bristled with combative energy, and the kind of vivid incident that Nelsons finds in everything he conducts. There was some tendency to compartmentalise things, to micro-manage detail at the expense of the overall symphonic scheme, which mattered more in the 30-minute opening movement than it did in the later ones where Nelsons regularly sought out the sinister undertow to the music, whether in the faster sections of the second, or the nature imagery of the third, despite the escapist dream offered by its offstage posthorn solos.

But the finale was very much all of a piece, and it built to a final, gloriously assured affirmation; the sense that every section of the orchestra was determined to give its music director the best possible send-off was quite obvious.”     …

Singalong with the CBSO: Carmina Burana

 ThumbnailCelebrate and Share

Sunday 9 February 2014 at 7.00pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121 345 0600

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

David Lawrence conductor

(Simon Halsey  conductor)

Katie Trethewey  soprano

Jeremy Budd  tenor

Alexander Robin Baker  bass

CBSO Chorus  

CBSO Children’s Chorus  

Ever   wondered what it’s like to sing live at Symphony Hall with the full CBSO? Now’s   your chance to find out, in this one-off performance from scratch of Carl Orff’s   uproarious Carmina Burana – 60 outrageously tuneful minutes of life,   lust and monks behaving badly! And whether you’re a choral society veteran or   have only ever sung it in the shower, you’re welcome to rehearse and perform   it today, under the CBSO’s world-famous chorus director Simon Halsey.

Information for singers: rehearsals start at 1.30pm; further details will be   sent with singer tickets. Scores: we will be using the Schott edition. To hire   a score with Simon Halsey’s rehearsal markings, please purchase the all-inclusive   Singer & Score Hire ticket when booking. NB If you’re not bringing your own   score, pre-booking of score hire via this ticket is essential. Pre-booked scores   can be collected on the day from 12.30pm by showing your score ticket. www.cbso.co.uk

If you like this concert, you might also like:

Belshazzar’s Feast, Saturday   26th April

Der Rosenkavalier, Saturday   24th May

Bluebeard’s Castle, Wednesday   2nd July

Britten 100: Centenary Concert

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Friday 22 November 2013 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121 345 0600

Simon Halsey  conductor

Nicholas Daniel  oboe

David Goode  organ

CBSO Chorus  

CBSO Youth Chorus  

CBSO Children’s Chorus  

Birmingham University Singers

Birmingham University Women’s Choir

Jubilate in C  3’

Six Metamorphoses after Ovid  12’

3 Two-Part Songs    7’

Friday Afternoons   20’

Hymn to St Cecilia   10’

Missa Brevis   10’

Prelude & Fugue on a Theme of Vittoria   5’

Rejoice in the Lamb 16′

“Blessed Cecilia, appear in visions to all musicians, appear and inspire.”   Britten’s originality never blazed more brightly than when it was most firmly   rooted in the English choral tradition. As the Orchestra tours to Japan, 100   years to the day since Britten’s birth, Simon Halsey directs the CBSO’s world-famous   choruses in some of Britten’s most striking choral inspirations – all interspersed   with his magical Six Metamorphoses for solo oboe. A universe in a grain   of sand: music to leave audiences stirred, beguiled and thoroughly entertained.

Due to the popularity of the Birmingham Christmas Market please allow ample time for your journey to Symphony Hall.

A taste of the CBSO’s celebrations of Britten in his centenary year

Britten 100

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“Chorus of approval for CBSO stalwart    

Simon Halsey is celebrating 30 years as CBSO chorus director and an induction into the Hall of Fame.”

Birmingham Post Article by Roz Laws here.

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Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post:

Click here for full review

…     “Now, in this all-Britten programme, the many choirs Simon has inaugurated under the auspices of the CBSO Chorus (the Youth Chorus, the Children’s Chorus – as well as the Birmingham University Singers and University Women’s Choir) delivered a brilliantly-arranged sequence of the composer’s choral music.

Projection, diction and disciplined responsiveness are perennial watchwords illuminating the performances of all these ensembles, and Halsey calls on these factors with such relaxed, expressive direction. And throughout, all the excellent soloists were drawn from the ranks of the various choirs. What a heartwarming triumph for all concerned.”  

*****

Nelsons Conducts Britten’s War Requiem

A BOY WAS BORN:

NELSONS CONDUCTS BRITTEN’S WAR REQUIEM

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Tuesday 28 May 2013 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121 345 0600

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Andris Nelsons  conductor

Erin Wall  soprano

Mark Padmore  tenor

Hanno Müller-Brachmann  baritone

CBSO Chorus  

CBSO Youth Chorus   CBSO Children’s Chorus  

Britten: War Requiem 88′ Listen on Spotify Watch on YouTube

“My subject is War, and the pity of War.” Benjamin Britten composed his War   Requiem for the new Coventry Cathedral, but it’s become one of the defining   achievements of modern music, a timeless and profoundly moving exploration of   man’s inhumanity to man. The CBSO gave its world premiere: this music is in   our blood, and every performance is special to us. Be there as Andris Nelsons   and an international team of soloists bring this deeply personal masterpiece   to Symphony Hall before taking the work on tour.

Unfortunately, Kristine Opolais has withdrawn from the War Requiem performances. This is due to physical changes in her voice over the last months, following the birth of her first baby, which have affected her work with this repertoire.

We are grateful to Erin Wall for agreeing to take her place at short notice.

Read all about the 50th anniversary performance of the War Requiem in Coventry   Cathedral in May 2012 here.

Explore Birmingham’s celebrations of Britten’s centenary here.

www.cbso.co.uk

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Review by Ivan Hewett, Telegraph:

Click here for full review

…     “In fact the clarity of sight and sound was all to the good. They showed up the special virtues of the conductor, Andris Nelsons, who refused to approach the work with the reverence it sometimes receives from British conductors. He just wanted to make it as thrilling and immediate as possible.

The result was that passages which can sound like a somewhat dim echo of earlier Britten came up fresh and new. The word “revelatory” is overused in concert reviews, but here it’s exactly right. There were whole passages which I felt I was hearing for the first time, like the “Recordare” chorus, and the beautiful semi-chorus in the “Liber Scriptus”, touched off by the pearly innocence of soprano Erin Wall (and how touching she was in the “Lacrimosa”, cushioned by the voices of the CBSO chorus.) The CBSO Youth Chorus, coming from way up above in the gallery, were moving just because they were so crystal clear.”     … 5 out of 5 stars

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Review by Roger Jones, SeenandHeard:

Click here for full review

…     “The final section, Libera me, was a tremendous climax, both dramatically and emotionally. In the Tremens factus choirs and orchestra (especially the brass and percussion) burst into a horrific cacophany of sound which as good as plunged the audience into the middle of a battle. This was Verdi – but far more terrifying. Then came one of Wilfred Owen’s most striking and hatrrowing poems, Strange Meeting, in which the poet meets in death the man he has killed. It was sung with dignity and sincerity by Padmore followed by Müller-Brachmann who effortlessly imparted meaning to every word and note. The final Let us sleep now, repeated by the soloists, was enveloped in the embrace of In paradisum from the Youth Choir and eventually by the whole chorus.

Simon Halsey insists the CBSO Chorus is the best choir in the world, and although there must be other contenders for the title, they certainly turned in an excellent performance this evening – as did the CBSO and Andris Nelsons who is now confirmed as one of the brightest stars in the musical firmament. But I single out for particular praise the two male soloists. I have always been impressed by Mark Padmore’s musical sensitivity but his feeling for the words he sings with such clarity and meaning. But now he has a rival: Hanno Müller-Brachmann!”     …

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Blog Post by The Plashing Vole:

Click here for full post

…     “As to the CBSO’s performance – they and the conductor Andris Nelsons proved yet again why they’re one of the best ensembles in the world at the moment. This difficult, complex music wasn’t just performed technically well: the dynamics and the emotional effects were perfect. The children’s choir was disturbing and ethereal and the largely amateur CBSO Chorus wrung every ounce of suffering and desolation from their parts. For me, the test of a good choir isn’t power and volume: it’s the ability to maintain beauty, diction and control in the quietest passages. The Requiem demanded total control and the Chorus demonstrated once again just how amazing they are.

At the end of the 88 minutes, performed without an interval (thankfully), the audience was stunned into silence. I’ve never heard such a long, profound silence after the baton went down. I was moved to tears, both by the subject matter and the performance and I think others were too. Nelsons stood there, slumped, exhausted and spent, until finally he exchanged weary, emotional hugs with the singers – they’d been through the emotional wringer and the event transcended the usual very British reserve seen on platforms.”     …

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Blog Post by Rodney Bashford, WarRequiem.Blogspot:

Click here for full post

...     “Does the powerful impact of War Requiem reduce with so much repetition?

Not from the performer’s perspective and, judging by the audience reaction last night, not for those who may have encountered it before or those, perhaps,  coming to it for the first time. The atmosphere was ‘electric’, the performance (like Coventry Cathedral) equally highly charged and the stunned silence at the end almost as long as that in Coventry. Let’s see what Europe now make of it!

 
These are some of the comments from Tuesday night’s performance:
 
Chorus Member
 
The audience don’t see Andris Nelsons’ entreating eyes, now anguished, now seraphic; the semaphoring mouth; the fluttering, eloquent hands as he dispenses with the baton; the sheer depth of involvement in communicating his vision.
Cellist
 
The sheer emotional response of all concerned, tears even in the eyes of hard-boiled back-desk violins, and even more so from the vocal soloists. Mark Padmore, exuded both anger at the crass futility of war, and overwhelming guilt and regret as he and the German “enemy” he killed are reconciled in eternal sleep.
 
Audience
 
The CBSO and CBSO Chorus were wonderful last night. Truly breathtaking and wonderfully conducted by Nelsons (as usual)!”     …
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Review by Andrew H King, BachTrack:
Click here for full review
…     “Conductor Andris Nelsons commanded the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, CBSO Chorus and Youth Chorus, as well as three excellent soloists, in one of those performances that linger in the memory for days after the final notes are heard. The steady, ominous opening provided an excellent opportunity for the orchestra to display the tightness of ensemble, Britten’s unforgiving use of rhythm from the off being a premonition that the worst is yet to come. The chorus also immediately matched the orchestral skill, each brief, disintegrating phrase possessing an accurate and intense level of attention to detail – Britten indicates masses of colour throughout the work and each instruction was rigorously observed. The initial entrance of the Youth Chorus, accompanied by chamber organ high up in the gallery and representing something ethereally beautiful, further cemented the performance’s high standards with excellent diction and precise intonation.”     …

A Boy Was Born: A Spring Symphony

Thursday 17 January 2013 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121 345 0600

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Edward Gardner conductor
Susan Gritton soprano
Kelley O’Connor alto
Allan Clayton tenor
CBSO Chorus
CBSO Youth Chorus
CBSO Children’s Chorus

Bridge: The Sea 19′ Listen on Spotify
Elgar: Sea Pictures 23′
Britten: A Spring Symphony 45′

It’s deepest winter in Birmingham, but at Symphony Hall, it’s spring! Benjamin Britten took a garland of poems, a children’s choir and a fistful of folksongs, and threw together his magical Spring Symphony: 45 irresistibly fresh minutes of blossoming tunes and rising sap. Principal guest conductor Edward Gardner has lined up an all-star team, and paired it with two bracing British seascapes to enter Britten’s 100th birthday year on the crest of a wave.

Explore Birmingham’s celebrations of Britten’s centenary here.

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Review by Andrew H. King, BachTrack:

Click here for full review

…     “Opening the concert, this suite provided an excellent opportunity to show off both the Symphony Hall acoustic and the CBSO. Elegant woodwind solos, particularly the extended flute solos of “Moonlight”, echoed as clear as crystal around the hall whilst the brilliant brass climaxes of “Storm” sought to deafen each audience member against the often boisterous gush of the strings. Of particular interest was the clarity of both the harp writing and performance; harps may easily get lost in the texture of large orchestral works if not suitably placed – but tonight every gliss and delicately fingered passage rang out with delicious accuracy. The performance and the music itself were a rare treat – one that I should like to see repeated.”     …

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Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post:

Click here for full review

…     “Orchestral response was pungent, flexible and versatile under Gardner’s assured direction, and at last we reluctantly approached the conclusion, a Mastersingers-like melee, cow-horn included, introducing the glorious “Soomer is icoomen in”.

There were smiles on so many faces as we ventured out into the night to see what winter had to throw at us.”

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Review by Hilary Finch, Times = £££

Click here for full review