Romantic Landscapes

 

Thursday 19 January 2012 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121-780 3333

 City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Karl-Heinz Steffens conductor
Sol Gabetta cello

Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Linz) 30′
Saint-Saëns: Cello Concerto No. 1 19′
Dvořák: Silent Woods for Cello and Orchestra 5′ Listen on Spotify
Dvořák: Symphony No. 8 36′

“Play me some village music – that’s what I like.” Antonin Dvorák certainly practised what he preached. He took the sounds and emotions of the Bohemian countryside and transformed them into one of the happiest symphonies ever written (listen out for his pet pigeons!). That’s just the climax of this joyous concert, which also features Mozart’s brilliant Linz Symphony and Saint-Saëns’ passionate First Cello Concerto – played with style by the stunning young Argentinian cellist Sol Gabetta. Summer sunshine on a January day!

To listen to some of the music in this concert, and explore the rest of the season, using our Spotify playlists, click here.

Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post:

Click here for full review

…     “Between the symphonies came added delight with the presence of Sol Gabetta, surely the most enchanting of cellists.

She immerses herself totally in the music (bopping along gleefully with the orchestra when not herself playing), and naturally creating a warm empathy with her orchestral colleagues.

To Saint-Saens’ First Concerto she brought both mercurial bowing and a well-burnished tone from her fabulous Guadagnini instrument, fleet and accurate in a bravura display in which songfulness was never far away.

And in the neatly-programmed encore, Dvorak’sSilent Woods, she created an atmosphere of quiet, serene concentration.”

Friday Night Classics: Classics at the Movies

Friday 28 October 2011 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121-780 3333

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Michael Seal conductor
Simon Bates presenter
Ben Dawson piano

Including music from:
Strauss: Also sprach Zarathustra (2001, A Space Odyssey)
Barber: Adagio for Strings (Platoon & The Elephant Man)
Wagner: The Ride of the Valkyries (Apocalypse Now)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 (The King’s Speech)
Mascagni: Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana (Raging Bull & Godfather III)
Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue (Manhattan & Gremlins 2)
Sibelius: Finlandia (Die Hard 2)
Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 (Brief Encounter)
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake (Black Swan & Billy Elliot)
Mahler: Adagietto (Death in Venice)
Saint-Saëns: Organ Symphony (Babe)
Rossini: William Tell Overture (Brassed Off & A Clockwork Orange)

Beethoven knew nothing of a future stammering king, and Rachmaninov didn’t compose with a great British screen romance in mind. Yet, from A Brief Encounter to The King’s Speech, classical music is synonymous with some of the most iconic moments on film, from the dramatic to the heartbreaking, the terrifying to the romantic. And played live, in 3D, in Symphony Hall’s incredible surround-sound, it’s even better without the pictures! www.cbso.co.uk

To listen to some of the music in this concert, and explore the rest of the season, using our Spotify playlists, click here.

The Organ Symphony

Thursday 5 May 2011 at 7.30pm

Symphony Hall, Birmingham +44 (0)121-780 3333

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra

Jun Märkl conductor
Sergio Tiempo piano
Thomas Trotter organ

Debussy: Le martyre de Saint Sébastien – Symphonic fragments 21′
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major 21′
Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3 (Organ) 34′

Sergio Tiempo’s Encore – Ginastera

You might have heard it in the film Babe, but trust us – when the mighty Symphony Hall organ crashes in at the end of Saint-Saëns’s Organ Symphony, and the CBSO’s trumpets raise the roof, you won’t be thinking about talking pigs! Few symphonies finish in such thrilling style, and with the full CBSO joined by Birmingham City Organist Thomas Trotter, one thing’s for sure: this concert is going to end with a bang. To whet the appetite, French music expert Jun Märkl dishes up a pair of very different French delights: Ravel’s deliciously jazzy Piano Concerto, with rising star Sergio Tiempo, and the latest landmark in the CBSO’s 10-year 2020 project – Debussy’s ultra-sensuous Symphonic Fragments.

Review by Christopher Morley, Birmingham Post:

http://www.birminghampost.net/life-leisure-birmingham-guide/birmingham-culture/music-in-birmingham/2011/05/05/review-jun-markl-cbso-at-symphony-hall-birmingham-65233-28640032/

…     “Acoustic chamber-doors wide open, and Thomas Trotter’s experienced rasping at the fabulous Symphony Hall organ added to the impact of this memorable performance.

Not, though, to eclipse the scintillating account of Ravel’s G major Piano Concerto, with Sergio Tiempo the deft soloist.”     …